casa mixquiahuala by omar vergara invites reflections and writing amid mexico’s arid nature

the house comes to life through its patios, designed as specific settings for reading, writing, and reflection, which act as extensions of the couple’s personal history.

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BIG designs all-wood cubic structure as “living curriculum” at University of Kansas

BIG KU mass timber cube

Danish architecture studio BIG, alongside faculty at the University of Kansas, has unveiled its design for the mass-timber Makers’ KUbe in Kansas, USA.

The structure will serve as an educational building for the University of Kansas (KU) School of Architecture & Design in Lawrence, Kansas. BIG‘s design was chosen as part of an open call, based on the “needs and wishes” of the students and faculty.

The 50,000-square-foot educational building will have a diagrid structure made completely from wood, a feat achieved through the use of notched glued laminated timber (glulam) and dowels based on traditional Japanese joinery techniques to eliminate the need for steel fasteners or plates.

BIG KU mass timber cube
BIG’s Makers’ KUbe will be located in a square among buildings at the University of Kansas

“Our design for the consolidated design studios at KU seeks to deploy all aspects of the profession in three distinct interventions: preservation, adaptation and new construction,” said BIG founder Bjarke Ingels.

“The Makers’ KUbe is conceived as a showcase in timber tectonics, traditional joinery, robotic manufacturing and sustainable materials.”

The building will have six storeys and be placed in a plaza surrounded by pre-existing structures, with bridges on its second level connecting it on two sides to the adjacent Chalmers and Marvin Halls.

BIG KU mass timber cube
It will have an all wood structure

It will have chamfered edges on all of the corners, creating entrance canopies on the ground floor and terraces up top. The facade will be completely clad in glass, with some of the panels open to the inside, and the others revealing the building’s insulation like “shadowboxes”.

“The timber bones of the building are exposed by stripping away all applied finishes – elevating structure to expression,” said Ingels.

“The building serves as a living curriculum, revealing all function, technology and structure as tangible elements for the students to appreciate and critique – learning solidified into built form.”

Inside, the building will feature exposed wood beams and panels, with a staircase that circles around the core. Around the staircase, at three points along its ascent, will be double-height spaces.

According to the studio, the core size was minimised by using a self-supporting, fire-resistant egress to expand the floor plates – the diagonal mass timber columns that make up the diagrid structure will aid in the load-bearing.

“A fire-resistant egress feature staircase spirals up the building, encouraging spontaneous moments of creative interaction and maximizing available floor space,” said the studio, adding “All interior materials are recyclable.”

BIG KU mass timber cube
A staircase will spiral throughout the building through double-height spaces

BIG will include photovoltaic panels on the roof and incorporate a rainwater-gathering system. The architecture studio will work with executive architect BNIM and structural engineer StructureCraft on the project.

BIG is also working on another mass-timber university building at John Hopkins in Maryland. The studio has also been working with 3D-printing construction company ICON to create a variety of projects in Texas.

The imagery is courtesy of BIG.

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Chris Pratt's destruction of Ellwood house in LA symptom of “systemic problems”

Zimmerman House by Craig Ellwood

Unprotected modernist houses are at risk of demolition as land often holds greater value than architectural heritage, says Docomomo US in response to actor Chris Pratt tearing down a home by architect Craig Ellwood.

Pratt and his wife Katherine Schwarzenegger drew attention online when news broke that the couple had begun work on a 15,000-square-foot home in place of the Zimmerman House by architect Ellwood, who designed buildings in Los Angeles from the early 1950s to the mid-1970s.

Located in the Brentwood area, across the street from a house owned by Schwarzenegger’s mother, the Zimmerman House was completed in 1950 and was one of Ellwood’s earliest projects.

It was demolished by Pratt and Schwarzenegger, who wanted to make use of the land for a sprawling mansion.

Docomomo US executive director Liz Waytkus claims the demolition of the mid-century home is part of a wider issue of sought-after land and location taking priority over the significance of historic homes.

“The problem is systemic,” she told Dezeen. “Older mid-century homes are smaller and underbuilt for their plots of land.”

“The land has become more valuable than the house, and even if people understand the value of such a home, location and land value often trump architectural significance.”

Interior of the Zimmerman House by Craig Ellwood
A mid-century house by Craig Ellwood was destroyed to make way for a mansion

The Zimmerman House was a one-storey home with original landscaping by Garrett Eckbo, which was also destroyed in the demolition.

The house was sold to Pratt at the end of last year. In a video taken at the home’s estate sale in 2020, which was recently shared on Tiktok, its structure and original fixtures appeared to be in good condition.

Waytkus likened the Zimmerman House demolition to the loss of the Geller I house in Long Island by modernist architect Marcel Breuer, which was torn down in January 2022.

She stressed that Docomomo US works to educate people on the history of homes like these, striving for the best outcomes for historic homes without treading on individual private property rights.

The group is currently working with the Southampton Village Board of Architectural Review and Historic Preservation on the protection of five homes in Southampton, Long Island, including a 1979 house designed by architect Norman Jaffe, which the original owner plans to demolish.

Waytkus expressed that conversations with property owners are important to protect the legacy of historic homes and at the very least, have them properly documented.

“We are reasonable people and would have appreciated the property owners having a conversation with community leaders such as Docomomo US/SoCal and the Los Angeles Conservancy in [the Zimmerman House] case, before pulling the demolition permit,” Waytkus said.

“At a minimum, some elements could have been retained or reused and the property should have been documented.”

“The homeowners also could have avoided this negative publicity by extending the opportunity for communication and collaboration with our community,” she added. “We are always open to having those conversations.”

Non-profit preservation group Los Angeles Conservancy flagged the planned demolition of the Zimmerman House in January, but no protections were made.

In 2022, Waytkus wrote that the demolition of Breuer’s Geller I house should be a wake-up call to protect modern buildings, which was followed up by Docomomo’s selection of 11 significant 20th-century buildings at risk of demolition in the US.

The photography is by Julius Shulman via Paul Getty Trust, Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles.

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Foster + Partners designs tiered Park Avenue supertall skyscraper

350 Park

UK architecture studio Foster + Partners has designed a tiered, 62-storey supertall skyscraper on Park Avenue in New York.

Located at 350 Park, the supertall skyscraper will rise approximately 1,600 feet high (487 metres), holding office spaces and a public plaza at ground level.

A skyscraper at night
Foster + Partners has designed a tiered skyscraper in Midtown Manhattan

Renderings show a tiered tower made up of rectangular volumes that increase in height across the tower’s width, with the tallest sitting at 62 storeys. A terrace sits on top of each level, while the tower rests on a double-height base supported by pillars.

“The tower will feature floor-to-ceiling glass, landscaped terraces, and a stepped configuration to create an iconic, distinctive skyscraper,” said the team.

The public plaza underneath will contain green space, seating areas, art displays and “opportunities for local businesses”.

White, stone-clad columns will line the street-level space, and reach upwards between the glass panelling to separate each of the building’s rectangular volumes into divided units on the facade.

The building will include a “high-performance building envelope” and use “resilient materials” as sustainable design strategies.

Developed by Ken Griffin, Vornado Realty Trust and Rudin, the 1.8 million square foot (167,225 square metres) project will “energize Midtown Manhattan” according to New York City mayor Eric Adams.

“Home to more than 6,000 jobs, this project will build on our continued efforts to energize Midtown Manhattan as the world’s most important business address and an economic engine for working-class New Yorkers,” said Adams.

The global investment firm Citadel is set to occupy 850,000 square feet (78,967 square metres) as “anchor” tenants.

Ground level lobby with columns
It will host office spaces as well as a large public plaza

The project is part of a wider initiative by Mayor Adams to “imagine Fifth Avenue as a more appealing district for residents, workers, and visitors,” said the team.

It is set to begin the city’s public review process in early 2025.

It is the newest in the studio’s additions to the storied New York City avenue. Foster + Partners is currently working on a JPMorgan Chase headquarters at 270 Park Avenue – which can be seen in the background of renderings of 350 Park – and completed a 47-storey tower at 425 Park Avenue in 2022.

The images are by Foster + Partners. 

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Cadence’s Exquisite Branding & Packaging Design

Cadence’s Exquisite Branding & Packaging Design

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Dive into Cadence™’s world where luxury hydration meets stunning branding and packaging design, by the creative experts at addressarts.

In the bustling metropolis of Los Angeles, a new brand rises, redefining the luxury hydration market. Cadence™, a brainchild of Ross MacKay and George Heaton, breathes life into the fusion of high performance and majestic living. This 2024 launch is a testament to the founders’ vision of translating athletic excellence into an elevated product experience.

Crafting a Visual Symphony

The challenge was formidable: to design an identity and branding that would be the beacon of luxury in a saturated market. The team at addressarts rose to the occasion, creating a brand identity that mirrors the product’s sophisticated science and the serene congruence of mind and body.

“Where precision meets art.” Cadence™ stands as a hallmark of design prowess. The brand’s typography, centered around the fluid logo, is a dance of elegance and adaptability. This is a brand that speaks in the language of daily routines and peak performance, all while championing focus and productivity.

The chosen typeface for the logo, Exposure by 205TF, exudes a sense of establishment, with connected edges that whisper the tranquility of water’s flow. Editorial New and Neue Montreal, sourced from PangramPangram, round out the brand’s typographic voice, delivering messages in harmonious clarity.

The Art of Realistic Imagery

Embracing CGI and renders, addressarts has pushed the boundaries of traditional design workflows. The result is a tactile visualization of the brand — imagining the cool touch of a Cadence™ can, the sight of it resting on a work desk, or accompanying a morning run.

“Envisioning the tactile sensation of premium hydration.” This meticulous process birthed not only a packaging design but a sensory prelude to the product itself.

Cadence™ now strides confidently into the future, its branding and identity presence as potent as the drink within its sleek cans. It’s an identity that grows alongside the brand, promising to keep pace with Cadence™ as it sets new industry benchmarks. As addressarts eagerly anticipates what’s on the horizon, one thing is certain: Cadence™ is poised to quench the thirst of the discerning, one can at a time.

Cadence™ packaging design is bold yet minimal at the same time. Despite the size and boldness of the logo, the can design looks clean and minimal. Black and white palette dominance allows for the fresh and pure feel, which perfectly aligns with the product’s all natural formula. Looking at the can, we can feel the science-backed ingredients blend without getting bored or overwhelmed.

Branding and visual identity artifacts

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For more information make sure to check out addressarts.com

UniFor presents new Andromeda furniture collection on Dezeen Showroom

Andromeda coffee tables by LSM for UniFor

Dezeen Showroom: in tandem with its release at Milan design week 2024, Italian design brand UniFor has listed its distinctive Andromeda furniture collection on Dezeen Showroom.

The Andromeda series comprises a credenza, tables, sofas and coffee tables, all of which were designed in collaboration with international architecture and design studio LSM.

Andromeda credenza by LSM for UniFor
The Andromeda collection’s credenza has a refined appearance

The Andromeda credenza has a stately, broad appearance with centrally-placed solid-fronted cupboards flanked by open shelving.

It comes in two sizes and, similarly to the rest of the collection, comes in a spectrum of materials and finishes to compliment its streamlined aluminium frame.

Andromeda tables by LSM for UniFor
Angular edges define the Andromeda tables

Tables are also included in the Andromeda series, and take the form of a smaller table with two legs and a larger one with three, which have a highly-polished, eye-catching aluminium materiality.

Either table can be crowned with a tabletop made from glass, travertine, concrete or walnut wood, among other materials.

Andromeda sofas by LSM for UniFor
Andromeda sofas come in two shapes

A duo of modular sofas also have their place in the collection, comprising either linear or gently curved segments.

Neutral-coloured leather upholsters the seats and backrests, while a sweeping aluminium base supports each section.

Andromeda coffee tables by LSM for UniFor
Andromeda coffee tables have a distilled, minimalistic appearance

The Andromeda coffee tables offer seven different sizes and two tabletop shapes – elliptical or round – and continue the collection’s striking use of materials and proportions.

Natural materials like travertine, leather and wood can be specified for the tabletop, as well as glass or concrete-effect slabs.

Andromeda coffee tables by LSM for UniFor
Various materials can be specified for the tabletop

UniFor is an Italian brand that was founded in 1969 and specialises in the design and manufacture of furniture.

The company frequently collaborates with international architects and designers to create furnishings that have an emphasis on refined materials and precise manufacturing techniques.

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